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DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKER PUSHES JVC GY-HD100 TO LIMIT ON 30-DAY SHOOT IN THAILAND JUNGLE

The documentary illustrates the conditions faced by 'domestic' elephants in Thailand and the importance of preserving this species.

The documentary illustrates the conditions faced by 'domestic' elephants in Thailand and the importance of preserving this species.

By

Wayne, NJ (December 4, 2006) Ð Director/Producer, Dr. Paul Cahill shot his 30-minute Asian Elephant documentary, "The Long Goodbye" using JVC's GY-HD100. The documentary illustrates the conditions faced by 'domestic' elephants in Thailand and the importance of preserving this species.

According to Cahill, "The GY-HD100 performed exceptionally well in all kinds of adverse conditions Ð it was knocked down by elephants, subjected to extreme temperatures and humidity of a tropical forest and launched from the cargo compartment of a speeding bus."

Throughout the 30-day shoot, Cahill captured 30 hours of video documenting Elephant Nature Park and the efforts of the Chiang Mai Rescue Center whose founder acquires abused and injured elephants. The camera's light weight allowed Cahill to follow the elephants and mahouts on their monthly trek to Elephant Haven, a place that allows the elephants to free run of the mountainside during the two-day stay. Cahill and the GY-HD100 adventured through several rivers and streams, and trekked up a muddy trail to the top of the mountain. On the trip down, Cahill and the camera took a few spills, proving again the camera's durability.

"I liked the layout of all controls, and the accessible menu," said Cahill. "Programmable camera settings allowed me to 'dial-in' the camera for various lighting situations faced when shooting documentary footage."

The GY-HD100 also took a road trip of its own when Cahill and his crew traveled to one location on a bus. The driver forgot to lock the luggage compartment door and swerved around a corner, throwing Cahill's camera into the intersection. Luckily, Cahill had stored the camera in its thermodyne shipping case, which absorbed the shock of impact.

This documentary was Cahill's first work in HDV. "At my age, I appreciate a whole lot of camera, without a whole lot of weight. And the easy-to-read menus are a sight for my old eye." Cahill lost his right eye during military service in Viet-Nam. As a result, Cahill feels, "The fact that the viewfinder on the GY-HD100 slides further than any other camera I've used was also a major factor for choosing JVC."

Cahill also plans to use the GY-HD100 to shoot several breeding and rescue centers throughout the U.S. such as the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon and the Elephant Sanctuary in Hohenwald, Tennessee. Based in Alameda, CA, Cahill has been producing and directing television and film productions for public television and private sector for 25 years.

The view video footage of "The Long Goodbye," visit http://web.mac.com/pecahill/iWeb/Site/Elephant%20Haven%202.html

ABOUT JVC PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS COMPANY

JVC Professional Products Company, located in Wayne, New Jersey, is a leading manufacturer and distributor of a complete line of broadcast and professional equipment. For more information about this, or any other JVC Professional Products Company product, contact JVC at (800) 582-5825; or Candace Vadnais at PFS Marketwyse 973-812-8883, ext. 430 or visit JVC's Web site at http://www.jvc.com/pro .